Pathways from English Language

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It includes the resources students will use to understand policies and processes governing their degree study and their transition to academic coursework. The program guides students to gain independence and become self-reliant and self-directed learners who are capable of utilizing the academic and personal resources and tools are available to them.
1. This Open Access Textbook will guide students through their English language to
academic degree studies. This textbook is used for three seminars in the Portland State
University Undergraduate Pathways Program: Introduction, Intermediate and Final.
Key elements include culture and expectations in an American university, transferring
academic skills from ESL to content-specific academic courses, and helpful exercises to
be academically successful.
Transition with Purpose:
Pathways from English
Language to Academic Study
Michele Miller and Anne Greenhoe
2. Transition with Purpose: Pathways
from English Language to Academic
Study
By Michele Miller and Anne Greenhoe
3. © 2018 Michele Miller and Anne Greenhoe
This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License
You are free to:
 Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
 Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.
Under the following terms:
 Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if
changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests
the licensor endorses you or your use.
 NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
This publication was made possible by PDXOpen publishing initiative
Published by Portland State University Library
Portland, OR 97207-1151
Cover art: oil painting by John Hoar, Portland, Oregon
All photographs: Beth Hoar, Portland, Oregon
4. We extend our sincere gratitude and appreciation to our reviewers. Your feedback was
invaluable in creating the final version of this textbook. Thank you to Megan McLaughlin and
Akiko Ota for their initial review of part one. Special thanks to Kate Batten for her initial review
and subsequent editing of part one. Her sharp eye and astute observations were invaluable in
completing this book. Thanks also to Shannon West for her contributions to the Pathways
Program and for her organization, creativity, and vetting of the materials in this textbook. Her
energy and insights helped to shape the structure and the content of the seminars.
Additionally, we thank Katie McCurdie, Amber Bliss-Calderόn, Errin Beck, and Amanda Franzoni
for their initial review of the outline for part two. We also wish to thank the Portland State
University Library for the PDXOpen publishing grant and Karen Bjork for being our liaison and
guide through the Open Access publishing process.
Part One: Program and University Policies and Procedures: Michele Miller, Academic and
Pathways Program Advisor, Portland State University
Part Two: Transition with Purpose to the University: Anne Greenhoe, Instructor and Curriculum
Designer, Portland State University
Using This Textbook
Part one of this textbook is a guide for moving from ESL study to academic study at Portland
State University*. It includes the resources students will use to understand policies and
processes governing their degree study and their transition to academic coursework.
Part two focuses on how academic skills are used across various disciplines and is comprised of
activities and assignments designed to practice these skills.
In seminars, students will use both sections simultaneously.
*While much of the content of this book relates specifically to Portland State University, it is our hope
that the structure of the text and the activities within it may inspire adaptations to fit the needs of other
colleges and universities.
5. PART ONE: Program and University policies and Procedures
Overview of Pathways Program .............................................................................................................. 7
General Overview ................................................................................................................................ 7
Progression through Pathways Program .............................................................................................. 8
Introduction to Pathways Program and Seminars .............................................................................. 10
Pathways Program Guidelines and Policies: All Pathways Seminars.................................................... 12
Academic Coursework Enrollment Guidelines ................................................................................ 12
Meeting Portland State University’s Undergraduate English Language Proficiency Requirement .... 13
Academic Standing ............................................................................................................................... 13
IELP Grades.................................................................................................................................... 13
IELP Academic Standing System ..................................................................................................... 14
IELP Academic Transcript ............................................................................................................... 15
PSU Academic Standing ................................................................................................................. 16
PSU Academic Transcript ............................................................................................................... 18
Pass/No Pass Grades (P/NP) .............................................................................................................. 20
IELP level 4 and 5 Classes ............................................................................................................... 20
How to Change Grade Options ...................................................................................................... 21
Repeat Policy ................................................................................................................................. 22
Calculating Grade Point Average (GPA) ................................................................................................ 23
University Structure .............................................................................................................................. 27
University Mission and Values ....................................................................................................... 27
University Organization ................................................................................................................. 27
Academic Affairs: Basic Structure ................................................................................................... 28
Admission Type and Class Standing ...................................................................................................... 30
Understanding Admission Type ......................................................................................................... 31
Viewing Admission Type in Banweb ............................................................................................... 31
Viewing Class Standing in Banweb ................................................................................................. 32
Transfer Students .............................................................................................................................. 33
Class Standing and Standing in Major and Degree .............................................................................. 35
Academic Plan Template .................................................................................................................. 36
PSU Website ...................................................................................................................................... 37
6. Banweb ......................................................................................................................................... 38
PSU Office of the Registrar................................................................................................................. 39
Degree Requirements ........................................................................................................................... 40
Degree Requirements Introduction.................................................................................................... 40
Overview of Bachelor Degrees ........................................................................................................... 41
Major Requirements.......................................................................................................................... 42
Undergraduate Programs: Degree Maps ............................................................................................ 42
Introduction to University Studies (UNST) .......................................................................................... 46
UNST Themes .................................................................................................................................... 48
Transfer Students and University Studies ........................................................................................... 49
Mathematics and Statistics Placement Test ....................................................................................... 50
Academic Advising................................................................................................................................ 53
Advising Resources ............................................................................................................................ 53
Advising and Career Services.......................................................................................................... 54
Academic Advising While in the Pathways Program ........................................................................... 55
Preparing to Meet with Your Major Academic Advisor ....................................................................... 56
Choosing Your First Academic Classes .................................................................................................. 57
Course Catalog .................................................................................................................................. 62
Schedule Planner Through MyPSU/Banweb ....................................................................................... 65
Course Planning Guide....................................................................................................................... 67
Practice Searching for Classes Online ................................................................................................. 68
Code of Student Conduct and Responsibility ........................................................................................ 72
Policy Preamble ................................................................................................................................. 73
Getting Involved ................................................................................................................................... 78
College, School and Department Activities ..................................................................................... 79
Preparing for Your Next Term of Study ................................................................................................. 79
Pre-Registration (IELP) and Registration (PSU) ................................................................................... 79
IELP Pre-Registration Form Preview ............................................................................................... 80
Pathways Program Participation and PSU Class Registration Agreement ........................................ 83
Step-By-Step Registration .................................................................................................................. 86
Managing Your Time with Google Calendar .......................................................................................... 93
7. Tuition Differential: IELP and PSU classes............................................................................................. 97
PSU New Student Orientation .............................................................................................................. 99
Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) ............................................................................................. 101
How to Read Your DARS Report: .................................................................................................. 101
PART TWO: Transition with Purpose to the University ....................................................................... 103
Section 1: Preparation of Goals ........................................................................................................... 103
Activity 1: Peer Share and Learn: Academic Classes ....................................................................... 104
Activity 2: Statement of Purpose .................................................................................................... 105
Activity 3: Statement of Purpose..................................................................................................... 108
Activity 4: Write a Statement of Purpose ........................................................................................ 109
Activity 5: Transferrable Skills ......................................................................................................... 110
Activity 6: Advising and Career Services (ACS) Scavenger Hunt ....................................................... 111
Activity 7: Write a Resume .............................................................................................................. 112
Activity 8 General Education Requirements and Themes in University Studies (UNST) .................. 114
Activity 9: Assignment Analysis ...................................................................................................... 116
Section 2: Getting Involved in the University ...................................................................................... 119
Activity 10: Getting Involved in PSU: Activities................................................................................ 120
Activity 11: Getting Involved in PSU: Attend an Activity in Your Major Department ........................ 122
Activity 12: Getting Involved in PSU: Observe a Class in University Studies .................................... 124
Activity 13: Action Plan for UNST Classroom Observation .............................................................. 126
Activity 14: Getting Involved in PSU: Advisor Conference ................................................................127
Academic Advising Appointment Form ............................................................................................ 129
Activity 15: Getting Involved in PSU: Attend a Workshop Offered by Advising and Career Services 130
Activity 16: Getting Involved in PSU: Request a Syllabus ................................................................. 132
Section 3: Collaborative Learning Support Activities............................................................................ 133
Activity 17: Mining a Syllabus: Time Management .......................................................................... 134
Activity 18: Peer Discussion: Learning Experiences In and Out of the Classroom ............................. 137
Activity 19: Email Etiquette ............................................................................................................. 138
Activity 20: Critical Incidents: What Would a Self-Sufficient Student Do? ....................................... 139
Activity 21: Self-Fulfilling Prophecies .............................................................................................. 143
Section 4: Writing Your ePortfolio ...................................................................................................... 144
8. Activity 22: Introduction to ePortfolios ........................................................................................... 145
Activity 23: Benefits of an ePortfolio ................................................................................................147
Activity 24: Student Perspectives on ePortfolios ............................................................................. 148
Activity 25: Activities at Portland State University .......................................................................... 150
Activity 26: Reflection on Your Statement of Purpose .....................................................................151
Activity 27: Reflection on Self-Fulfilling Prophecies......................................................................... 152
Activity 28: Reflection on Participating in Major Activities ...............................................................153
Activity 29: Reflection on Academic and Career Advising Activities ................................................ 154
Activity 30: Midterm Reflection for Intermediate Seminar .............................................................. 155
Activity 31: Midterm Reflection for Final Seminar ........................................................................... 156
Activity 32: Last Day Review for Introduction Seminar ..................................................................... 157
Activity 33: Last Day Review for Intermediate Seminar ................................................................... 158
Activity 34: Last Day Review for Final Seminar ................................................................................ 159
9. OVERVIEW OF PATHWAYS PROGRAM
GENERAL OVERVIEW
The Pathways Program promotes and supports student academic success during the transition
from the Intensive English Language Program (IELP) to degree study at Portland State University
(PSU). The Pathways Program:
 creates a positive connection with students’ academic departments.
 reviews important PSU policies and guidelines governing degree study.
 improves students’ understanding of PSU and major expectations.
 promotes academic success by transferring skills among disciplines.
 supports students academically and culturally as they begin their academic
classes at PSU.
All international students, who intend to earn an undergraduate degree (bachelor’s or post-
baccalaureate) at Portland State University and who have not earned the required scores on an
English language proficiency test, are required to participate in the Pathways Program.
Completion of the Pathways Program satisfies PSU’s English language proficiency requirement.
A language proficiency test score is not required of students who complete the program.
Students are expected to earn a 2.7 grade point average (GPA) in their level 4 and 5 classes,
including the Pathways seminars, to officially meet the university’s language proficiency
Students who do not complete the Pathways Program will be required to submit a language
proficiency test score to be able to move to degree study at PSU. Students who earn the
required language proficiency test score while in the Pathways Program will be able to begin
full-time academic study in the next term and will be waived from required participation in the
program. For more information about PSU’s English language proficiency requirements, refer to
the information provided by PSU International Admissions.
While Pathways students will follow a general academic program, each student’s path and
academic plan will be unique and based upon his/her individual circumstances and goals.
10. PROGRESSION THROUGH PATHWAYS PROGRAM
The following charts present the general progression as students move through the Pathways
9-MONTH PATHWAY
Students in the 9-month program will take three Pathways seminars: Introduction,
Intermediate and Final. Students who are consistently in the same level across all skill areas in
their first term in the program (level 4) will participate in the 9-month program.
First term: all IELP classes (level 4); Pathways Introduction Seminar
Second term*: two level 5 classes/one or two PSU classes; Pathways Intermediate Seminar
Third term*: two level 5 classes/one or two PSU classes; Pathways Final Seminar
Next term: full-time academic study at PSU
*Admission to PSU is required to continue in the second and third terms of the Pathway.
6-MONTH PATHWAY
Students in the 6-month program will take two Pathways seminars: Introduction and Final.
Students who are in mixed levels (levels 4 and 5) in different skill areas will participate in the 6-
month program.
11. First term: all IELP classes (mixed level 4 and 5 classes); Pathways Introduction Seminar
Second term*: complete level 5 classes/one or two PSU classes; Pathways Final Seminar
Next term: full-time academic study at PSU
*Admission to PSU is required to continue in the second term of the Pathway.
The following charts illustrate the difference between the two pathways and shows the
progression through the program.
12. INTRODUCTION TO PATHWAYS PROGRAM AND SEMINARS
The IELP to PSU Pathways Program is designed to provide support to students as they transition
from ESL coursework to university academic coursework and degree study. Students will
participate in the Pathways Program for two or three terms, depending upon the level of their
IELP classes (see charts on previous page). Each term that students participate in the Pathways
Program, they will enroll in one of the following Pathways seminars: Pathways Introduction,
Pathways Intermediate or Pathways Final. Each seminar is a 2-credit IELP course.
The Pathways Program curriculum focuses on connecting students with resources and
reinforcing academic skills necessary to be academically successful in their chosen major and in
their undergraduate degree program. The program guides students to gain independence and
become self-reliant and self-directed learners who are capable of utilizing the academic and
personal resources and tools available to them.
The content of the Pathways seminars features two distinct concentrations:
 program and university policies and processes
 academic skills development and skills transference among disciplines
In addition to English language proficiency, international students will benefit from the
following activities and preparation in order to have an academically successful university
 understanding the U.S. educational system
 navigating the university structure and understanding campus resources
 understanding cultural differences in academic settings
 understanding institutional rules and services
 meeting with professors and advisors
 practicing and understanding interdisciplinary skills
The Pathways Program curriculum was developed in part based upon feedback from PSU
students, faculty and advisors and was informed by a literature review of student development
Source: Greenhoe A., Miller, M. (2016-2018). IELP Pathways Research. Unpublished research,
Portland State University, Portland, OR.
Class time for each Pathways seminar will consist of brief readings, activities and assignments
that are designed to increase understanding of university academic expectations, policies and
guidelines and degree completion requirements. Additionally, students will learn about and
practice transferring skills across different academic disciplines and explore co-curricular
13. opportunities across campus. Throughout the course of the program, students will use the
PebblePad ePortfolio platform to create and curate a learning portfolio that includes academic
planning and self-reflection.
While students will be using English to develop their knowledge and skills in the Pathways
classes, English language is not the academic discipline being studied. Students are strongly
encouraged to bring a laptop computer or tablet to class, as many of the materials used in the
seminars will be viewed and accessed online. Following is a brief description of each of the
Pathways seminars.
PATHWAYS INTRODUCTION SEMINAR
This seminar will introduce students to the policies and procedures governing their degree
study at PSU. Students will be guided through the steps to select and register for academic
classes in which they will enroll in their next term of study, including meeting twice with
university academic advisors and learning to use online resources. Using the PebblePad
ePortfolio platform, students will create a one-year academic plan and set academic and
personal goals. Effective time management and planning strategies are introduced.
PATHWAYS INTERMEDIATE SEMINAR
This seminar will provide support to students as they take their first PSU academic classes.
Strategies and exercises, designed to promote critical thinking skills and how to apply these in
their classes, with an emphasis on transferring skills learned in ESL classes to academic classes,
will be introduced. Students will use their experiences in PSU academic classes as a platform for
individual reflection and group discussion. Using the ePortfolio created in the Pathways
Introduction Seminar, students will monitor and track their academic progress. There will be an
emphasis on continuing to build academic skills and connecting with their major departments.
Students will meet individually with an advisor in their major in order to select their academic
courses for their next term of study. Registration for the next term of study is reviewed and
conducted during the term.
PATHWAYS FINAL SEMINAR
In this seminar, students will review and reflect upon the academic goals and plan established
in the Pathways Introduction seminar, with a focus on applying academic skills for success in
the PSU classes that they are taking concurrently with ESL coursework. Students will continue
to use their experiences in PSU academic classes as a platform for individual reflection and
group discussion, continuing to develop and curate their ePortfolios. Students will prepare for
full-time academic study at PSU, including participating in PSU academic department activities,
attending PSU New Student Orientation, and participating in the IELP to PSU Transition
14. PATHWAYS PROGRAM GUIDELINES AND POLICIES: ALL PATHWAYS SEMINARS
Students must demonstrate satisfactory academic performance in all classes (IELP core skills
classes, Pathways seminars and PSU academic classes) in order to advance through the
Pathways Program and enroll in PSU academic classes while in the program. Satisfactory
academic performance typically means completing each course with a C grade (73%) or better.
ACADEMIC COURSEWORK ENROLLMENT GUIDELINES
Pathways Program students are expected to enroll concurrently in IELP and PSU academic
classes for one or two terms, depending on their Pathways Program placement (6-month or 9-
month). Authorization to enroll in PSU academic classes is contingent upon satisfactory
academic progress in IELP classes. The grade point average (GPA) requirement for enrolling in
academic classes is as follows:
 Authorized to enroll in 1 PSU academic class:
Minimum requirement: 2.0 term GPA; 2.0 GPA in each class
 Authorized to enroll in 2 PSU academic classes:
Minimum requirement: 3.0 term GPA; 3.0 GPA in each class*
*Students who meet this requirement may elect to take one academic class; they are not
required to take two academic classes.
REPEATING CLASSES
Students who fail one or more IELP class, including Pathways seminars, while in the Pathways
Program, will repeat the class(es) in the following term, as per standard IELP academic
guidelines. Failing one or more IELP class will delay a student’s transition to academic
Students who fail a core IELP class will move into the next sequence of the Pathways
Program seminars (Intermediate or Final) in their next term of study. However, they
will not be permitted to enroll in PSU academic classes in the next term.
Students who fail a Pathways seminar will repeat the seminar in their next term of
study. They will not be permitted to enroll in PSU academic classes in the next term.
15. MEETING PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY’S UNDERGRADUATE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT
Completion of the Pathways Program satisfies PSU’s English language proficiency requirement.
Submission of a language proficiency test score is not required for students who successfully
complete the Pathways Program.
All students who intend to study for an undergraduate degree (bachelor’s degree) at Portland
State University and have not submitted a language proficiency test score that meets PSU’s
requirement, will participate in the Pathways Program. Students are expected to earn a 2.7 GPA
in their level 4 and 5 classes while in the Pathways Program to meet the university’s language
proficiency requirement and move to all-academic coursework.
Students who do not participate in and successfully complete the Pathways Program will be
required to submit a language proficiency test score to be able to study at PSU, even if they
have completed level 4 and 5 IELP academic preparation classes (core skills).
ACADEMIC STANDING
Students enrolled in IELP classes have two transcripts and are subject to the IELP Academic
Standing System and the PSU Academic Standing System. It is important to understand the
details contained in each transcript, as well as how the two are similar and different.
1. IELP transcript: available only by request from the IELP office or the Pathways
Advisor
2. PSU transcript: available online through the student’s PSU Banweb account
IELP GRADES
IELP classes are credit classes through the PSU Department of Applied Linguistics. All IELP
classes appear on both transcripts with the course prefix LING. Grades earned in IELP classes
will always show as A-F on the IELP transcript. All grades are counted and calculated in the IELP
grade point average (GPA).
Grades earned in level 4 and 5 IELP academic preparation classes are calculated in the PSU
grade point average and are counted in both the PSU term and cumulative GPA. Level 4 and 5
classes are graded A-F in the PSU transcript unless students intentionally change the grade
option to Pass (P)/No pass (NP). P/NP grades have no grade points associated with them and do
not impact the PSU GPA. Credits are still earned with the P/NP grade option.
Grades for Skills Enhancement Classes (SECs) and Pathways seminars always show as P/NP on
the PSU transcript unless the student changes the grading option to A-F, according to the
university’s posted grade option change deadlines.
16. IELP ACADEMIC STANDING SYSTEM
The purpose of the Academic Standing System is to ensure students are successful in their
classes and to identify students who may be struggling academically and need additional
support. There are five categories of academic standing:
Academic Excellence: Passing grades earned in all classes and term GPA 3.7 or above.
Good Academic Standing: Passing grades earned in all classes and term GPA 2.0 or above.
Academic Warning: One or more failing grades; failing a class for the first time -OR-term GPA
below 2.0.
Academic Probation: One or more failing grades for the second time; failing one or more
classes for the second time -OR-term GPA below 2.0 in two consecutive terms.
Academic Dismissal: One or more failing grades for the third time; failing one or more classes
for the third time -OR- term GPA below 2.0 in three consecutive terms. Students who are
academically dismissed may not continue to study in the IELP and must transfer to another
language program or return home. This decision may be appealed through the IELP Academic
Standing Committee.
17. IELP Academic Standing System
Good Academic Standing requires students to earn a GPA of 2.0 or above for each term (term
GPA) and maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above.
IELP ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPT
Students may view or obtain their IELP Academic Record, also known as a transcript, by making
a request at the IELP front desk. Alternatively, students may view their transcript with their
Pathways Advisor.
Following is an example that shows that all grades appear as A-F in an IELP transcript.
The same classes are used in the example of the PSU academic transcript, appearing on page
18, in order to demonstrate how grades earned in the same term appear as Pass (P) or No Pass
18. IELP transcript example:
PSU ACADEMIC STANDING
Guidelines for satisfactory academic progress for undergraduate and post-baccalaureate
students are established by the PSU Scholastic Standards Committee. The Scholastic Standards
Committee (SSC) is a Faculty Senate committee comprised of teaching, research, and non-
teaching faculty across campus.
The SSC has the authority to place any student on academic warning, probation, or dismissal
according to the following guidelines:
19. 1. Grade changes or removal of incomplete grades do not change academic standing
status.
2. Academic standing in the current term may be changed by engaging the repeat policy,
however repeating courses will not retroactively change the status of a past term.
3. Students who are academically dismissed from PSU are not permitted to register either
full-time or part-time.
4. When evaluating undergraduate academic standing, only PSU undergraduate credit is
considered.
5. Students on academic warning or probation, who receive only grades of I, X and/or NP,
will lose academic standing, meaning that they will progress to the next level in the
academic standing system.
PSU UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC STANDING PPOLICY
Good Standing
When the term GPA is 2.00 or higher and the cumulative Portland State GPA is 2.00 or
higher, students are in good academic standing. Good Standing is not recorded on the
academic transcript.
Academic Warning
Students with 12 or more attempted credits (including PSU and transfer work), whose
cumulative PSU GPA falls below 2.00, will be placed on Academic Warning. A registration
hold will also be applied to the student record until completion of a mandatory workshop
facilitated by Advising and Career Services. Students who are placed on Academic Warning
are limited to a maximum of 13 credits in future terms unless an Academic Advisor approves
a larger course load.
Academic Probation
Students on Academic Warning will be placed on Academic Probation if they do not meet one of the
following requirements:
1. Raise their cumulative PSU GPA to 2.00, thereby returning to Good Standing
2. Earn a GPA for the given term of 2.25 or above, thereby remaining on Academic Warning
and subject to the same requirements in the next term. Students who are on Academic
Probation are limited to a maximum of 13 credits per term unless approved for more by an Academic
Advisor.
Academic Dismissal
Students on Academic Probation will be dismissed at the end of the term if they do not meet
one of the following requirements:
1. Raise their cumulative PSU GPA to 2.00, thereby returning to Good Standing
2. Earn a PSU GPA for the given term of 2.25 or above, thereby remaining on Academic
Probation and subject to the same requirements for the next term.
20. Academic Reinstatement
Students who are dismissed may only be reinstated to the University upon petition to, and
approval by, the Scholastic Standards Committee (see Petitions). If reinstatement is
approved, students will be reinstated to Probation status.
Improving Academic Standing
Students whose current academic standing is Warning, Probation or Reinstatement must
earn at least a 2.25 GPA each term to maintain their current academic standing. Earning a
2.25 or higher term GPA does not revert current academic standing to the previous standing.
In order to return to Good Standing, students must raise their cumulative PSU GPA to a 2.00
or higher.
Students are encouraged to speak with their academic advisor about their academic
standing and ways to improve their GPA.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/registration/academic-standing, December 20, 2018, © Portland
State University 2018.
PSU ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPT
The PSU academic transcript is a term-by-term academic history, with courses taken, credits
attempted and earned, grades for each course, term GPA and cumulative GPA. Student type
from initial admission to PSU and academic standing are also noted. Student type is used to
determine general education requirements through University Studies (covered in more detail
in a later section) and is also linked to class standing (freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior;
also covered in a later section). Students who have no previous university credits are freshmen,
whereas students who have completed coursework at another college or university that has
been accepted at PSU, may have advanced class standing at admission.
ACCESSING YOUR PSU UNOFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT:
1. From the PSU home page, go to MyPSU (top right corner)
2. Go to School Tools
3. Go to Banweb
4. Go to Student Services
5. Go to Student Records
6. Go to View Unofficial Academic Transcript
Or, go directly to Banweb
Following are excerpts that show how P/NP grades and A-F grades appear and are counted in
GPA calculations on the PSU transcript. The same terms presented in the IELP transcript in a
previous section are shown here for the sake of comparison.
21. Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
22. Pass/No Pass Grades (P/NP)
IELP LEVEL 4 AND 5 CLASSES
Level 4 and 5 classes in the IELP are automatically graded A-F and show as A-F in your PSU
academic record. Skills Enhancement Classes (SECs) and Pathways Seminars taken while in
levels 4 and 5 are automatically graded P/NP. The grades earned in levels 4 and 5 are part of
your undergraduate PSU transcript and university GPA. Classes taken P/NP are excluded from
GPA calculation. Students may change A-F grades to P/NP, and SEC classes and Pathways
seminars from P/NP to A-F, according to the university’s add/drop/grade option change
P/NP grades do not have a grade point average associated with them, but they are counted as
credits attempted/credits earned. The maximum number of P/NP credits allowed during a
student’s entire degree study is 45. Please note that:
 P/NP grades earned in levels 0-3 IELP classes are not counted in the maximum number
of P/NP credits.
 Earning a P grade does not improve or lower your PSU GPA.
 Earning an NP grade does not improve or lower your PSU GPA.
 Both F and NP grades reflect that a student failed the course.
For students who change one or more of their level 4 or 5 classes to P/NP for the PSU
transcript, the actual grade earned for the class (A-F) is still recorded in their IELP transcript and
record. The actual grade is also counted in the IELP GPA and is used to calculate the level 4 or 5
GPA for Pathways Program completion purposes.
Students may change their grade option from A-F to P/NP for their level 4 and 5 classes, and to
change P/NP to A-F for Skills Enhancement Classes and Pathways seminars. Students who wish
to change one or more classes to P/NP must do so according to the university’s policies,
procedures and deadlines.
In general, students are discouraged from changing level 4-5 grades to P/NP, except in very
specific circumstances and in consultation with their Pathways Advisor. If you are considering
changing a level 4 or 5 class to P/NP, it is strongly recommended that you discuss this with your
Pathways Advisor prior to making the change.
23.  The deadline to change grade option in fall, winter and spring terms is the end of week 7
of each term.
 The deadline to change grade option in summer term is the end of week 5.
See the PSU Registrar’s website for the academic calendar and deadlines.
IELP classes are part of the PSU undergraduate GPA only. Students who will enroll in graduate
courses at PSU will have a separate GPA for graduate study.
HOW TO CHANGE GRADE OPTIONS
Use the PSU Special Registration Form to change grade options. Complete the top portion of
the form with your contact information and complete Section III with the course information.
Note that instructor approval is NOT required to change grades to A-F or P/NP. Submit the
completed form to the Registration and Records window in the Registrar’s Office or send it by
email to [email protected]
24. 1. If you fail a level 4 or 5 class (D, F or NP grade), you will repeat the class in the next term
of study.
a. Upon completing the class a second time, you may replace the failing grade with
the passing grade earned the second time. The failing grade will be removed
from your PSU GPA but will remain on your transcript.
b. You may have a lower GPA in the term that you failed the class. However, at the
end of the following term, your GPA will increase when the failing grade is
excluded and only the passing grade is included in the calculation.
c. A Notice of Repeated Course Form must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office in
order for the failing grade to be excluded from the GPA calculation. The form
may submitted at any time during your degree program.
d. When repeating a course and replacing the grade, the course must be graded A-F
both times. Courses taken P/NP cannot replace a failing grade.
2. There is a limit to the number of credits you may take P/NP. A student may take 45
credits of P/NP credits during their degree study.
a. If you select P/NP for all level 4 and 5 classes, 32 of the 45 credits will be used for
IELP classes. Only 13 credits will remain for the remainder of your degree study
at PSU.
b. It is more important to be able to use the P/NP option during degree study than
during IELP study. Using a large number of P/NP credits for IELP classes will
greatly limit the number available for use later at PSU.
REPEAT POLICY
Following is the PSU Repeat Policy. The Policy and form can be found on the Registrar’s
website.
25. Source: https://www.pdx.edu/registration/repeat-policy, December 21, 2017, © Portland
State University 2018.
CALCULATING GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)
It can be helpful to understand how term GPA and cumulative GPA are calculated. Portland
State University computes current term and cumulative GPA according to the following scale:
A = 4.00 C = 2.00
A- = 3.67 C- = 1.67
B+ = 3.33 D+ = 1.33
B = 3.00 D = 1.00
B- = 2.67 D- = 0.67
C+ = 2.33 F = 0.00
26. TO CALCULATE GPA FOR ONE TERM:
1. Multiply the point value of the letter grade (see scale above) by the number of credit hours. The
result is the grade points (quality points) earned.
2. Total the credit hours for the term; total the quality points for the term.
3. Divide the total quality points by the total credit hours. The result is the GPA for the term.
Here is an excerpt that demonstrates how each of these components appears on a transcript
for the term GPA calculation:
Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
TO CALCULATE CUMULATIVE GPA
1. Follow steps 1 and 2 above for each term.
2. Total the credit hours from all terms; total the quality points from all terms.
3. Divide the total quality points for all terms by the total credit hours for all terms. The result is
the cumulative GPA.
Example:
Term 1 Term 2
B- 3 credits C+ 4 credits
C 3 credits A- 5 credits
A 2 credits B- 3 credits
C- 3 credits B 4 credits
D+ 4 credits
24
27. TERM 1 CALCULATION:
B- = 2.67 x 3 credit hours = 8.01 quality points
C = 2.00 x 3 credit hours = 6.00 quality points
A = 4.00 x 2 credit hours = 8.00 quality points
C- = 1.67 x 3 credit hours = 5.01 quality points
D+ = 1.33 x 4 credit hours = 5.32 quality points
Add the number of quality points for term 1:
8.01 + 6.00 + 8.00 + 5.01 + 5.32 = 32.34 quality points.
Add the number of credit hours for term 1:
3 + 3 + 2 + 3 + 4 = 15 credit hours.
Divide the total quality points by the total credit hours:
32.34 / 15 = 2.15 GPA
TERM 2 CALCULATION:
C+ = 2.33 x 4 credit hours = 9.32 quality points
A- = 3.67 x 5 credit hours = 18.35 quality points
B- = 2.67 x 3 credit hours = 8.01 quality points
B = 3.00 x 4 credit hours = 12 quality points
Add the number of quality points for term 2:
9.32 + 18.35 + 8.01 + 12 = 47.68 quality points.
Add the number of credit hours for term 2:
4 + 5 + 3 + 4 = 16 credit hours.
Divide the total quality points by the total credit hours:
47.68 / 16 = 2.98 GPA
CUMULATIVE GPA CALCULATION:
Add the quality points for all terms:
32.34 (term 1) + 47.68 (term 2) = 80.02 quality points.
Add the credit hours for all terms:
15 (term 1) + 16 (term 2) = 31 credit hours.
Divide the total credit hours for all terms by the total quality points for all terms:
80.02 / 31 = 2.58 GPA
28. Here is an excerpt that demonstrates how each of these components appears on a transcript
for the term and cumulative GPA calculation:
Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
GENERAL GPA INFORMATION
 Only courses graded on an A-F basis are used in calculating GPA. Courses taken as P/NP, credit-
by-exam, correspondence, and audit are not included.
 The GPA calculation never includes transfer work from other colleges.
 Separate GPAs are printed on transcripts for undergraduate courses and for graduate courses.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/registration/calculating-grade-point-average, December 21, 2017,
© Portland State University 2018.
Path on the bank of the Willamette River
in Portland, Oregon
26
29. UNIVERSITY STRUCTURE
Various departments at PSU work together to provide quality services and instruction. This
section provides a brief overview to demonstrate how the university works as a single
educational entity to support all aspects of your enrollment. Administrative services, student
services and academic units each fulfill a function that contributes to the vision, mission and
values of the university and the student as an individual.
UNIVERSITY MISSION AND VALUES
Portland State University leads the way to an equitable and sustainable future through
academic excellence, urban engagement, and expanding opportunity for all.
 We serve and sustain a vibrant urban region through our creativity, collective
knowledge and expertise.
 We are dedicated to collaborative learning, innovative research, sustainability and
community engagement.
 We educate a diverse community of lifelong learners.
 Our research and teaching have global impact.
 We promote access, inclusion and equity as pillars of excellence.
 We commit to curiosity, collaboration, stewardship and sustainability.
 We strive for excellence and innovation that solves problems.
 We believe everyone should be treated with integrity and respect.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/portland-state-university-mission, December 21, 2017, ©
Portland State University 2018.
UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATION
 Office of Academic Affairs (OAA): Manages s curriculum, instruction, and all matters
that relate to academics.
 Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA): Oversee the university’s services
to students outside of the classroom.
 Finance and Administration (FADM): Represents departments that manage campus
functions such as transportation, budgeting, campus facilities and campus safety.
30. The university’s current organizational chart can be found on the Finance and Administration
(FADM) webpages. Here is a simplified visual of the major components of the university:
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS: BASIC STRUCTURE
Academic Affairs is the central administrative office, with responsibility for the institutional
academic mission, programming and policy implementation, support programs for academic
personnel and students, academic fiscal management, and collective bargaining with the
American Association of University Professors (AAUP-PSU Chapter), and the Portland State
University Faculty Association (PSUFA). Academic Affairs is guided by the Provost who serves as
Chief Academic Officer of the university. Working with deans and other administrators, the
Provost collaborates with the campus and external communities to achieve the academic
mission and vision of the University.
Source: www.pdx.edu/academic-affairs/about-us, March 6, 2018, © Portland State University
Most universities are comprised of several schools or colleges, which house specific majors and
programs of study. The highest administrative position in a school or college is a dean, and all
deans possess an academic and teaching or research background and nearly always a doctoral
degree. There may also be various associate and assistant deans within a school or college,
depending on its size. All faculty within a school/college report to the dean. All deans report to
the provost of the university. The provost is normally the highest position within academic
affairs and reports directly to the president. This general structure is typical of most colleges
and universities within the American higher education system, though specific position names
may vary according to the institution.
31. SCHOOLS AND COLLEGE OFFERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS AT PORTLAND STATE
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS)
College of the Arts (COTA)
College of Urban and Public Affairs (CUPA)
Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science (MCECS)
OHSU-PSU School of Public Health
School of Business Administration (SBA)
School of Social Work (SSW)
SCHOOLS OFFERING ONLY GRADUATE PROGRAMS:
Graduate School of Education (GSE)
Graduate School of Social Work (GSSW)
Within the American system of higher education, many university instructors are also referred
to as professors and hold terminal degrees in their field of study. For most areas of study, a
doctoral degree is the terminal degree. One exception to this general rule is the Master of Fine
Arts degree (MFA).
When beginning their teaching or research careers, most professors begin as an assistant
professor, then progress to associate professor and finally to full professor as they build their
teaching and research portfolios and gain tenure. Teaching professionals who do not hold a
doctoral degree are often categorized as instructors and are not formally addressed by the title
of professor. There may be different ranks of instructor, depending upon the college or
university’s policies and procedures.
Assistant, associate and full professors generally teach and/or research full-time.
Non-tenured teaching faculty (NTTF) may hold degrees at any level (doctoral, master’s,
bachelor’s) and most often teach full-time. NTTF are not eligible for tenure.
Adjunct professors and instructors are typically engaged to teach on a part-time basis.
Path in the countryside
32. ADMISSION TYPE AND CLASS STANDING
Knowing and understanding your admission type and class standing is necessary to be able to
successfully manage several different aspects of your academic career. Your class standing
determines when you will be able to register for classes each term and the classes that you will
be able to take, including your University Studies (UNST) requirements.
Year Standing Credits earned Course level University Studies
First Freshman 0-44 100-200 Freshman Inquiry (FRINQ)
Second Sophomore 45-89 100-200 Sophomore Inquiry (SINQ)
Third Junior 90-134 300-400 Junior Clusters
Fourth Senior 135-180 300-400 Senior Capstone
The number of credits with which you are admitted, and your student admission type
determine your class standing in your first term of study. After your first term of study, your
admission type will remain the same, but your class standing will change as you earn more
Credits may have been earned at another university (transfer credits) or at PSU through the
IELP (institutional credits). Credits earned through the IELP are counted in a student’s credit
total for academic standing, but they do not exempt students from the University Studies
requirement for each year of study that is based solely upon admission type.
For example, if a student is admitted to PSU as a freshman with no previous university study,
the student will be required to fulfill the Freshman Inquiry (FRINQ) course through University
Studies, even if the student has earned credits in the IELP that place them in a higher class
standing. University Studies is more fully explored in a later section.
Highway with long view and cloudy sky
33. UNDERSTANDING ADMISSION TYPE
Admission type is determined at the time that students are admitted to PSU. This code and type
is permanent and issued only one time. Following are the most common admission types:
(GED) -Students admitted using a recognized GED examination. Mostly domestic, but some
International students take the GED as well
(Pre-High school Grad-No College) - Undergraduate students admitted before secondary
school graduation and do not have college level transfer credit
(Pre- High school Grad with College) - Undergraduate students admitted before secondary
school graduation but have college level transfer credits
(High school Grad 0-11 College Cr) - Undergraduate students admitted with proof of secondary
school completion and fewer than 12 transferable college credits
(High school Grad 12-29 College Cr) - Undergraduate students admitted with proof of
secondary school completion and fewer than 30 transferrable college credits
(Transfer 30-44 hours) - Undergraduate students admitted with 30-44 transferrable college
(Transfer 45-89 hours) - Undergraduate students admitted with 45-89 transferrable college
(Transfer 90-134 hours) - Undergraduate students admitted with 90-134 transferrable college
(Transfer 135+) - Undergraduate students admitted with 135 or more transferrable college
Post-Bac (General)-PB - Post-Baccalaureate students who will pursue a second bachelor’s
degree or Undergraduate level certificate
VIEWING ADMISSION TYPE IN BANWEB
You will need to know your admission type and class standing for academic planning purposes
in the Pathways Program.
1. Go to MyPSU on the PSU home page
2. Go to Log in to Banweb
3. Go to Student Services
4. Go to Student Records
5. Go to View Unofficial Academic Transcript
(Transcript Level: = All Levels; Transcript Type: =Self Service – Web Display)
34. Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
VIEWING CLASS STANDING IN BANWEB
1. Go to MyPSU on the PSU home page
2. Go to Log in to Banweb
3. Go to Student Services
4. Go to Registration and Class schedule
5. Go to Check your Registration Status
Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
35. TRANSFER STUDENTS
If you are a transfer student with credits transferred from a different institution (either from
within the U.S. or overseas), there are additional steps that you must take to ensure that you
will be able to register for the correct classes. Each transfer student’s situation is different and
you will need to work with the Office of International Admissions to have your credits from
previous courses evaluated. It is possible that not all credits will be accepted by PSU, so it is
important to determine how many credits PSU will accept as well as their PSU course
equivalencies. In some cases, it may be necessary for academic departments to be part of the
transfer evaluation.
TRANSFER CREDIT EVALUATION
Students who have earned credit at another college or university should initiate a Transfer
Credit Evaluation with the Office of International Admissions as soon as possible. Transfer
Credit Evaluations can be conducted ONLY with official transcripts.
PSU may accept credits completed at another college or university toward your degree
requirements and it is extremely beneficial to know the classes that PSU has accepted BEFORE
you begin selecting PSU academic classes. In most cases, you do not want to repeat a course
that you have already taken elsewhere. If PSU does not have a direct equivalent to a course
that you have taken at another college or university, you may request a Transfer Credit
Evaluation through your major department.
In this case, advisors and/or professors in your major will review detailed information about the
course(s) taken. If the content of the course(s) is similar to a course at PSU, and if you acquired
the same knowledge, PSU may accept the other course in place of a PSU course.
It may be necessary to obtain syllabi or course descriptions from the university where the
course was previously taken. This can often take weeks or months of additional time. In some
cases, and when possible, it may be helpful to go to the college or university in person to obtain
the necessary documentation.
36. Additional information for students with transfer credit from the PSU Office of International
a. Students can be admitted as undergraduate students based on unofficial transcripts,
but an official transfer credit evaluation can only be initiated after OFFICIAL
transcripts are submitted.
b. Students who are admitted based upon submission of unofficial transcripts are
instructed to submit official transcripts in their admission letter.
c. When official transcripts are received by International Admissions, the transfer
credit evaluation for undergraduate students will begin automatically.
d. Transfer credit evaluations for students applying for post-bac admission status are
not automatic. A PSU academic advisor must specifically request a transfer credit
evaluation for post-bac students.
e. Transfer credit evaluations may take up to several weeks to complete, depending on
the institution(s) where students completed previous work.
f. Transcripts must be sent directly to PSU from the university where the courses were
taken.
g. Additional information about official documents
h. Additional information and FAQs
UNIVERSITY STUDIES REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Details about University Studies (UNST) themes and courses are presented in a later section.
The following information applies only to students who have earned more than 29 transfer
A student who has earned more than 29 credits at another university, either in the U.S. or in
another country, will be classified as having earned “transfer” credit for UNST purposes and
may be exempt from one or two years of University Studies requirements.
30-59 credits = waived out of FRINQ; must complete 3 SINQs
60-74 credits = waived out of FRINQ; waived out of 1 SINQ; complete 2 SINQ
For MCECS majors:
For each FRINQ or SINQ credit waived, students must earn an equal number of Arts and
Letters/Social Science elective credits. Maximum waiver credits are 27 (all FRINQ and SINQ).
6 IELP credits may count as Arts and Letters elective credits.
37. CLASS STANDING AND STANDING IN MAJOR AND DEGREE
Class standing is primarily used to determine when students can register according to the
university’s registration schedule. It may have little or no relevance to how many additional
credits will be needed to earn a degree in a particular major. For example, you may be a junior
in university class standing, but a freshman in your major.
University-level transferrable credits
These are credits earned at another college or university that PSU will accept as general elective
credits, but do not fulfill degree requirements.
Example: Physical Education courses or courses that do not have similar content to PSU classes
Degree-applicable credits
These are credits earned at another college or university that PSU will accept as part of the
courses/credits required for a PSU degree in a specific major.
Example: Math 251, Writing 121, Art 120
Not all university-level transferrable credits are degree-applicable credits.
Example: You have a high number of transferrable credits and thus upper class standing, but if
none of those credits can be applied to your degree requirements in your major, you may be
considered a “freshman” in your major.
Steep steps
leading to street
level
38. ACADEMIC PLAN TEMPLATE
Use this template to complete your academic plan. You can then save the PDF and update it
each term that you are in the Pathways Program.
39. PSU WEBSITE
From the PSU homepage, you can quickly navigate much of what you need for managing your
classes. Specifically, you are able to access multiple resources and tools through the quick menu
and myPSU site as illustrated below. As a student, it is essential that you become familiar with
PSU’s student account interface, Banweb. Banweb is the university’s student information
system and it allows students to access and manage their personal and academic information.
You are encouraged to explore the many facets within your Banweb account and to become
comfortable and familiar with using it to manage your student record.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu,
February 9, 2018, © Portland State University 2018.
40. There are multiple ways to access Banweb and other tools through the PSU homepage,
including from the Quick Menu and myPSU options in the top right corner of the page. Some of
the tools that you will use most frequently as a student are Banweb, your student email and
calendar, and D2L. D2L is an online learning platform that many instructors use to interact with
students and to manage content for the course. You are encouraged to download the myPSU
application to your mobile devices.
Here are some examples of the information and features found in Banweb:
 Personal information
 Emergency contact
information
 PSU ID number
 Academic information
o Major
o Class standing
o Admission type
 Unofficial transcript
 Registering for classes
 Student account
 Account holds
 Major change form
Understanding how to use Banweb to search and register for classes is covered in a later
Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and
its affiliates
41. PSU OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR
The Office of the Registrar is an important academic resource and one that you will use
regularly for the duration of your degree study.
Examples of information provided by the Registrar’s Office (RO) include the university’s
academic calendar (term dates, term calendars, add/drop deadlines, priority registration
schedule), tuition and fees, academic policies, and other matters pertaining to students’
academic records. You are encouraged to spend time reviewing the website and in particular
the A-Z Index of information and services, which includes links to forms, policies and
publications such as the current PSU Bulletin/Catalog, a comprehensive academic guide to the
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/registration, December 20, 2017, © Portland State University
42. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS INTRODUCTION
To earn an undergraduate degree at PSU, all students complete:
 Major Requirements
 Degree Requirements
 General Education Requirements (this will be explored fully in a later section)
 93% of employers agree that the capacity to think critically, communicate clearly
and solve complex problems is more important than major.
 80% of employers agree that regardless of major, every college student should
acquire broad knowledge in the liberal arts and sciences.
Source: It Takes More Than a Major: Employer Priorities for College Learning and Student
Success. 2013. Retrieved from
There are basic requirements that all PSU students must complete in order to earn a bachelor’s
degree. All credits must equal or exceed the following credits in each specific area as explained
on the PSU webpage detailing graduation requirements. Some majors may have a higher credit
Source:
https://www.pdx.edu/advising/require
ments-for-a-baccalaureate-degree,
February 9, 2018, © Portland State
University 2018.
Through General Education, the foundation of the bachelor’s degree, students gain knowledge,
skills and experiences that will enhance their learning in their chosen major.
43. OVERVIEW OF BACHELOR DEGREES
There are several types of bachelor degrees and each type requires a specific number of credits
in a specific distribution of academic areas. Degree requirements and major requirements may
overlap in some cases. The number of total credits needed for degree completion is generally
180, however some majors may have higher credit completion requirements. Most of the
information outlined in the following section can be found on these advising pages on the PSU
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
o 28 total credits (may be more depending on foreign language placement)
o 16 credits in Arts & Letters (4 of these credits must be in Fine & Performing Arts)
o 4 credits in Sciences/Math (excluding Math 100 or lower)
o 8 credits in Social Sciences/Sciences/Math (excluding Math 100 or lower)
**International students whose first language is not English automatically meet
the foreign language requirement, either by submitting an English language
proficiency test score, or by successfully completing the Pathways Program.
More information about the BA Foreign Language requirement can be found on the World Languages &
Literatures website.
Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
 28 total credits:
o 12 credits in Sciences (not including Math/Statistics; 8 of the 12 credits must be
coursework with a lab or fieldwork)
o 12 credits in Arts & Letters/Social Sciences
o 4 credits in college-level Math/Statistics (excluding Math 100 or lower)
Bachelor of Music (B.M.)
 Students must complete a program of music and applied music as prescribed by the
Music Department.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
 Students must complete the specific program as prescribed by the Fine Arts
department.
44. *Students completing a BS, BM or BFA who have not met the Second Language requirement
will also need to satisfy this requirement prior to graduation. Please see the World Languages &
Literatures website for information how to satisfy the requirement.
With many majors, students may select either the B.A. or the B.S. degree. However, there are a
few exceptions. For example, Applied Linguistics, English, International Studies, Judaic Studies
and World Languages majors may only earn a Bachelor of Arts degree, while Engineering and
Computer Science majors may only earn a Bachelor of Science. Only music majors may select
the Bachelor of Music and only Art Practices and Creative Writing majors can select the
Bachelor of Fine Arts and both of these require selective admission to the major via audition or
portfolio. Students should consult with the appropriate academic advisor regarding options in
their intended major.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/advising/bachelor-arts-bachelor-science-and-bachelor-music,
February 16, 2018, © Portland State University 2018.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
A major is a primary field of study with an in-depth academic focus. Within their major,
students will develop a significant level of knowledge in a specific academic area. To complete a
bachelor’s degree, students must complete the requirements for one of the majors offered by
PSU. PSU offers over 100 majors and the number of credits required for each major varies. This
information and more can be found on this advising page.
Details about the specific requirements for undergraduate programs offered by PSU are located
on each academic department's website, all of which can be accessed through this main page.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS: DEGREE MAPS
Use the online Degree Mapping tool to find:
 links to every major, minor and certificate at PSU
 complete lists of courses required, term-by-term, for every degree
 direct connections to academic advisors in each program
 career resources for every program, including relevant jobs and professional organizations
42
45. Degree Maps Disclaimer:
The Degree Maps provided on this site are academic planning tools to be used by students in
consultation with an academic advisor. Degree Maps for the current year are displayed. The
University makes every effort to offer required courses in the terms outlined, but the Maps do
not constitute a promise that all courses will be offered in the terms indicated. The Maps do
not replace the official Degree Audit System (DARS) used to certify degree completion, which is
subject to department and University approval. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy, but the
Maps are subject to update and correction.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/degmap/college-maps, February 20, 2018, © Portland State
University 2018.
46. Following is an example of a Degree Map (first and second year only) for a BS in Architecture:
ARCH_BS_16.pdf, February 20, 2018, © Portland State University 2018.
Students should be aware that a majority of their classes in the first two years of study may be
degree electives or general education (University Studies). In addition to degree elective
courses, students will also complete major elective courses. Both are necessary for degree
completion, regardless of major. Major elective courses provide breadth of knowledge to the
major courses that are studied in the third and fourth years of degree study.
A general definition of the term “elective” may mean that something is optional. However,
when elective is used in the context of degree study, it is a requirement that students must may
fulfill through selection of one option among several.
In the Degree Map in Architecture showing the first two years of degree study previously cited,
of the 22 courses in the first two years of study, nine are major courses. The remainder of the
47. coursework is comprised of elective courses required for a BA degree and six courses within
University Studies.
University Studies (UNST) courses are required for all majors and for degree completion at
Portland State University. These general education courses develop the connection of all
subjects studied as part of an undergraduate degree. It is this integration and interdisciplinarity
that are at the core of a liberal arts education. More information about UNST coursework is
outlined below and can be found on this UNST webpage.
University Studies provides students with integrated and connected learning experiences that
lay the foundation for lifelong intellectual development. Extending through all four years, the
program teaches students how to think critically, communicate effectively, and gain a broad
awareness of the human experience to instill a deep sense of responsibility to oneself, their
peers and their community.
Source: PSU Advising and Career Services presentation to IELP, 2016
48. INTRODUCTION TO UNIVERSITY STUDIES (UNST)
The source for the following information is the University Studies landing page on the PSU
website. Nearly all institutions of higher learning require students to complete a general
education program in addition to their major field of study. Portland State University's
nationally recognized approach to education is based on an extensive review of current
research. Strong evidence shows that tightly structured clusters of courses with an
interdisciplinary thematic approach help to create a more effective education program.
Using mentored inquiry sections, extending the program throughout the four years, and
integrating carefully articulated goals further increase the program’s effectiveness. The
University Studies general education program is designed to provide those environmental
factors and learning opportunities that are known to enhance learning, satisfaction, and
retention for students.
University Studies begins with Freshman Inquiry, a yearlong course introducing students to
different modes of analysis and provides them with the tools to succeed in advanced studies
and their majors. At the sophomore level, students choose three different Sophomore Inquiry
courses, each lead to a thematically linked, interdisciplinary cluster of courses at the upper level.
Finally, all students are required to complete a Capstone course, which consists of teams of
students from different majors working together to complete a project that addresses a real
problem in the Portland metropolitan community.
Placement within the University Studies sequence is based upon the student’s admission type.
Students who earned university credit at another college or university before matriculating at
PSU may be exempted from some UNST requirements based upon the number of credits
earned and accepted as transfer credits.
Credits earned in IELP classes are included in calculating class standing, however credits earned
in IELP classes are NOT included when determining UNST placement and requirements. For
example, a student admitted as a freshman with no previous university study who studies in
the IELP for 3 terms may earn 50 or more credits. The student will have sophomore standing
but their UNST placement will be in FRINQ.
View this VIDEO for more details about University Studies
49. All PSU students admitted as freshmen with no previous college coursework are required to
meet the UNST requirements outlined below. Transfer students may have earned credits at
another institution that are equal to some UNST courses. All students, regardless of transfer
credits, will need to fulfill some or all UNST requirements in order to graduate.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/unst/unst-introduction, February 9, 2018, © Portland State
University 2018.
This table demonstrates the number of credits necessary for each category of class standing
and the corresponding University Studies placement for each year of study.
Year Standing Credits earned Course level UNST course
First Freshman 0-44 100-200 FRINQ
Second Sophomore 45-89 100-200 SINQ
Third Junior 90-134 300-400 Junior Cluster
Fourth Senior 135-180 300-400 Senior
Capstone
50. UNST THEMES
The courses in UNST have different themes and students may choose a theme that aligns with
their major. For example, a graphic arts or architecture major may be interested in taking
“Work of Art,” where students study through different visual and written texts. Science majors
may be interested in the theme “Design and Society,” which explores how we create the world
we live in.
Students who choose a theme that does not align directly with their major will still gain the
required foundation that the general education program provides. For example, the theme
“Immigration, Migration, and Belonging” explores what it is to live in an increasingly
multicultural world. Many students choose the “Portland” theme because they want to learn
more about the various historical, social and political aspects of the city.
Regardless of the theme that students select, they will gain insight by connecting various
experiences and perspectives, while also developing research and critical thinking skills. Each of
these components give them a well-rounded basis as they acquire their liberal arts education.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/unst/freshman-inquiry-course-themes, February 9, 2018, ©
Portland State University 2018.
51. TRANSFER STUDENTS AND UNIVERSITY STUDIES
Students who have transferred credit to PSU from another college or university must either
transfer credits equivalent to UNST courses or complete UNST courses to gain the credits
necessary to graduate from Portland State University. The following information is sourced
directly from the UNST website.
Students are placed in the University Studies program according to the number of transfer
credits completed once enrolled in classes at Portland State University (PSU) as a formally
admitted student. After registering for courses at PSU as a formally admitted student,
additional credits completed at another institution will not change this placement. Note that
Non-Degree (also known as “Quick Entry”) admission is not formal admission, and courses
completed at PSU as a Non-Degree student are considered transfer credits for University
Studies placement. As noted previously, credits earned through IELP classes are not counted in
UNST placement.
Placement in the University Studies program will be reflected on a student’s Transfer Evaluation
and/or DARS report. As the table below indicates, students who transfer with 90 or more
credits will have the lower-division portion of the University Studies courses waived (FRINQ and
SINQ). Students exempted from lower-division UNST requirements must still complete the
Upper-Division Cluster and Senior Capstone, a total of 18 credits. Note: The Upper Division
Cluster requirement is a PSU requirement. There are no equivalent courses offered at other
institutions. Three cluster courses must be chosen from the list of approved courses and may
not come from the major department.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/unst/transfer-students-and-university-studies, February 9, 2018,
© Portland State University 2018.
52. MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS PLACEMENT TEST
ALEKS Math Placement Exam
Students with majors specified below are required to complete the ALEKS Math Placement
Exam. For the university’s purposes, the only exception is if a student has completed a college-
level math course (level 100 or above) at a college or university within the past 12 months.
For the purposes of the Pathways Program, all students in the Pathways Introduction Seminar
are required to complete the math placement exam as a required, graded class assignment.
Becoming familiar with an online testing system such as ALEKS is beneficial to all students,
regardless of their major.
All students in any of the majors listed below must complete the Math Placement Test (ALEKS)
BEFORE meeting with an academic advisor in their major area of study. Students who have not
completed the Math Placement Test will not be ready to meet with their PSU academic advisor,
and their advisor will not be able to fully assist them in recommending academic courses to
take in the next term.
Majors requiring the Math Placement Exam
Business Administration (all SBA majors)
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Earth Science
Electrical Engineering
Environmental Science
Health Studies
Mechanical Engineering
Pre-Health Professions*
*Pre-Health Professions tracks include students planning to pursue pre-nursing, pre-medicine,
pre-dental, pre-dental hygiene, pre-optometry, pre-pharmacy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-
veterinary, pre-naturopathy, pre-clinical lab science, pre-radiation therapy and/or pre-
chiropractic programs.
53. Notes about the Math Placement Test:
 The math placement test is an online test
o Students may log in to the test from any computer with an internet connection,
on- or off-campus.
o Results will be immediately available upon completing the test
o Results will be automatically reported in students’ PSU student records and
available to advisors on campus
o Students should not study or prepare to take the math placement test; the test is
meant to determine the correct level of math class appropriate to students’ skills
without advance preparation
o Students may register for any math class within their score code OR BELOW
 Many students choose to begin their math classes below their actual
placement level. Although students may have strong math skills, studying
math in English will be more challenging than studying it in their first
language.
Carefully review all of the instructions and information provided about the math placement test
BEFORE logging in to begin the test. You can also access the test portal through your Banweb
Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
54. Additional information, including placement exam scores and math class options, can be found
on the department’s website.
Score Course Placement
MTH 251: Calculus I
ECE 103: Engineering Programming
76 - 100
ECE 171: Digital Circuits
PH 201: General Physics
MTH 112: Introductory College Mathematics II
61 - 75 CH 221: General Chemistry
ECE 102: Engineering Computation
MTH 105: Excursions in Mathematics
MTH 111: Introductory College Mathematics I
MTH 211: Foundations of Elementary Mathematics I
46 - 60 STAT 105: Elementary Data Analysis
STAT 241: Application of Statistics for Business
STAT 243: Introduction to Probability and Statistics I
(Click here for STAT 243 registration instructions)
30 - 45 MTH 095: Intermediate Algebra
0 - 29 None (Click here for further instruction)
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/math/placement/instructions, February 9, 2108, © Portland
State University 2018.
55. For questions relating to the Math Placement Test or math placement at PSU in general,
 Math Department at 503-725-3621
 Placement Coordinator at [email protected]
ACADEMIC ADVISING
ADVISING RESOURCES
Each academic department at PSU determines its own structure for providing academic
advising. For this reason, it is important for students to understand the advising structure in
their academic department and also other departments in which they may be taking classes.
Some departments offer drop-in advising on certain days and times, others offer advising by
appointment only. Many departments use an online appointment scheduling system, whereas
others may require a telephone call to make an appointment. Some advisors may be booked
out for weeks or even a month or more, so it is important to plan ahead.
Depending on the college or school, students may have a lower-division advisor (first two years)
and an upper-division advisor (last two years). Generally, lower-division advisors are
professional advisors whose main responsibility is academic advising. Upper-division advisors
may be professional advisors (e.g. business majors) or they may be teaching faculty who also
have academic advising responsibilities within their department (e.g. computer science and
engineering majors). Your major’s school/college webpages will be your best resource for
understanding the advising structure for your major.
In addition to your department’s webpage, here is a centralized source for the physical location
of all academic advising on campus.
advising-locations, February 9,
2018, © Portland State
University 2018.
56. ADVISING AND CAREER SERVICES
Advising and Career Services (ACS) offers academic advising to students who have not yet
selected a major (undecided/undeclared). ACS advisors can also meet with students who have
declared a major but have general advising questions about degree requirements, University
Studies or selecting classes. Students can access the ACS website to see a listing of advisors and
to make advising appointments.
Additionally, ACS offers a variety of workshops and other helpful services, including exploring
majors, personality type and career choice, résumé creation and many others. View the ACS
workshop and events calendar for more information.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/advising-career-services/, February 9, 2018, © Portland State
University 2018.
57. ACADEMIC ADVISING WHILE IN THE PATHWAYS PROGRAM
The relationship that you develop with your academic advisor(s) is one of the most important of
your academic career. Your advisor will make recommendations to keep you on track and
moving toward your academic goals to attain your degree.
While you are in the Pathways Program, you will have two advisors:
 Pathways Program advisor in the IELP
 Academic advisor in your major
Your major advisor will make recommendations to you about the academic classes that you
should take while you are in the Pathways Program. Your Pathways Program advisor will review
your proposed classes and schedule and they will make the final determination of classes that
you will register for each term while in the program. Additionally, your Pathways Program
Advisor will review your grades and academic plan each term, make adjustments as needed,
and make final decisions about your course registration.
After you fully matriculate to academic degree study at PSU, you may work with just one
advisor until the time that you complete your degree, or you may work with multiple advisors.
As previously noted, some academic departments conduct all advising through professional
advisors. Other departments may have professional advisors for lower-division (LD) students
(first- and second-year students) and then faculty advisors for upper-division (UD) students
(third- and fourth-year students) and students fully admitted to professional programs. While in
the Pathways Program, academic advising is structured as follows:
TERM 1: PATHWAYS INTRODUCTION (6-MONTH AND 9-MONTH)
 Meet with your major advisor in small groups, usually during class time
Pathways Program Advisor monitors and approves schedule and registration for the
next term
TERM 2: PATHWAYS INTERMEDIATE (9-MONTH)
 Make an individual appointment with your major advisor to meet one-on-one in his/her
office
 Pathways Program Advisor monitors and approves schedule and registration for the
next term
TERM 3: PATHWAYS FINAL (6-MONTH AND 9-MONTH)
 Individual advising appointment with major advisor as-needed (not required)
 Academic advising during PSU New Student Orientation session
 Pathways Program Advisor monitors and approves schedule and registration for the
next term
58. PREPARING TO MEET WITH YOUR MAJOR ACADEMIC ADVISOR
Your academic advisor in your major will be able to provide information and answer questions
about courses required for your major and courses needed to meet the requirements of your
degree. Your major advisor will assist you in planning for your next terms of study and in
creating a plan for completing your undergraduate degree.
Pathways Introduction: You will meet with an academic advisor in a small group with other
students with the same major, most likely during class time. The purpose of this first advising
session is to meet your advisor, gain a general understanding of the expectations for your major
and learn his/her recommendations for the academic courses you will take in your next term of
Pathways Intermediate: You will schedule an individual appointment with an academic advisor
in your major. In this way, you will learn how to make an appointment with an advisor for your
major and where advising for your major is located. Additionally, this appointment may be a
required assignment for your pathways seminar.
Preparing for this meeting and using the time with your advisor in a productive way is
important for both of you. It is recommended that you prepare at least three questions to ask
your advisor. If this meeting is an assignment for your seminar and requires a signature or other
verification, it is appropriate to request the signature or verification at the end of the
appointment. It is not acceptable to inform your advisor that the advising appointment is only
to fulfill a required assignment for class.
Examples of questions to ask your major advisor:
1. What are the academic classes you should consider taking in your next term of study?
2. What university studies courses will you take and when will you take them?
3. How do you know which university studies courses to choose? For example, is there
a FRINQ or SINQ theme that is recommended for your major?
4. Is there a GPA requirement in your major for graduation?
5. Is there an admission process for your major to be able to take upper-division
(300-400 level) classes?
6. Are their student groups to join in your college/school/major?
7. What is your advisor’s advice for being academically successful in your major?
8. Other questions that pertain to your individual circumstances
59. Pathways Final: Students in the Pathways Final Seminar are in their last term of study in the
program and are preparing for full-time enrollment in academic classes in their next term of
study. Portland State University requires that all students beginning full-time undergraduate
academic study attend a New Student Orientation session before beginning full-time
Your Pathways Program advisor will coordinate your registration for a PSU New Student
Orientation. At the Orientation, you will meet other American and international students in
your major, participate in a review of general education and degree requirements, and meet
with an academic advisor in your major. You will complete registration for the next term of
study at the Orientation.
While in the Pathways Final Seminar, you have the option of making an individual appointment
to meet with your advisor before attending New Student Orientation, but it is not required.
Upon transitioning to all academic coursework, it is strongly recommended that you meet with
your major advisor at least one time each term.
CHOOSING YOUR FIRST ACADEMIC CLASSES
Helpful Terms
 Pre-requisite: course that must be completed before being eligible to take a particular
course
 Co-requisite: course that must be taken at the same time as another particular course
 Recitation and lab: supplemental course to be taken at the same time as the primary
course
 Mentored inquiry: supplemental course to be taken concurrently with UNST classes
 Sequential courses: courses that must be takin in a particular order
 Bulletin and catalog: publications that show listings of courses, degree requirements,
etc.
GUIDELINES FOR CHOOSING YOUR FIRST ACADEMIC CLASSES
 100 or 200-level classes
 No online classes
 No UNST classes (except UNST 194: College Success), unless an exception is granted
 Completion of Independent Research Writing required to take WR 121
 Completion of level 5 listening/speaking required to take COMM 220
 Choose classes that interest you; explore new things
 Remember that only about 30% of the classes required for your degree will be in your
major
60. Options for searching for courses and viewing
course details are outlined below:
Option 1: Search the Class schedule through
Banweb. This option is view-only and is good
for researching class details and planning your
Option 2: Search within Banweb while logged in. This account will allow you to directly add
classes (if registration is open and you are eligible to register).
Source: © 2018 Ellucian Company L.P. and its affiliates
Using the “Look-up Classes to Add” function within Registration allows students to explore
classes by department in the online Class Schedule. Note that the term must be selected before
being able to search.
61. The university’s class schedule for the next term is generally made available online in about
week 5 of each term. The exact date of availability can be found on the Registrar’s website.
NOTE: Although Pathways Program students will be able to view classes in the online class
schedule, you will only be able to ADD or DROP classes according to the priority registration
schedule managed by the Office of the Registrar and the registration time line established by
the Pathways Program advisor. Additionally, approval from the Pathways Program advisor is
required in order to register for academic classes. Consequently, you may register on a date
later than when registration is first available to you.
It is recommended that you spend some time exploring the online class schedule to become
familiar with the various details of viewing and understanding the information presented. For
example, the following are various codes used to describe specific details about classes:
62. Within the course schedule in Look-Up Classes to Add, you can look up classes by department:
By doing a non-specific search by subject, you will see all course offerings in that department:
Click on “View Sections” to see the course information for each section.
63. After selecting a class, you can look at the course description:
Course description:
64. By clicking on the course name, you can view the course details:
CRN 10383, BI 201, Fundamental of Biology, Section 001, 3 credits, T/R, 10:00-11:20
[CRN = course record number (10383); Subj = department (BI); Crse = course number (201); Sec
= section (001); Title = course name (Fundamentals of Biology); Days; Time]
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COURSE CATALOG
The Office of Academic Affairs (OAA) publishes a catalog, or bulletin, for each academic year
that includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the university. To look at the bulletin
for the current academic year, visit the OAA website. Bulletins may be viewed as a single PDF
document or as a fully online source.
65. 1. Go to the OAA website
 You will be able to look at courses offered within a department and courses offered
within a college/school
2. To view courses by department, select “Courses” from the left menu at the bottom
66. 3. Then, select the academic department to view the courses being offered in that department.
This example shows only the first part of the list that is organized alphabetically. Scroll down to
view all subjects.
Source: https://www.pdx.edu/academic-affairs/psu-bulletin, February 20, 2018, © Portland
State University 2018.
PSU homepage/Quick Menu
You can also use the Quick Menu to find course options and sections when you know already
the specific course that you wish to view.
Instructions:
1. Go to the PSU home page
2. Go to “Quick Menu” in the upper right corner of the page
3. Select “find a class”
4. Select the term for which you are registering (e.g. Spring 2018)
Source: https://www.pdx.edu, February 9, 2018, © Portland State University 2018.
67. SCHEDULE PLANNER THROUGH MYPSU/BANWEB
You are encouraged to practice looking at a variety of classes that you are interested in taking
and do not focus solely on classes for your major. Remember that in addition to courses in your
major, you must complete degree elective courses and general education/UNST courses in
order to complete your undergraduate degree.
Online resources:
Schedule Planner Information Sheet (a quick how-to guide)
Schedule Planner Tutorial
Schedule Planner Information Video
Step-by-step instructions:
1. Go to myPSU on the PSU homepage or access the myPSU app on your mobile device
2. Click on the “Classes” button
3. Click on the “Academic Planning” button
4. Click on the “Schedule Planner” option
5. You will be prompted to log in to Banweb
6. Complete the steps using the screenshots below
NOTE: Using the schedule planner does not register you for classes. It is for planning
purposes only.
1. Add Course
68. 2. Search by Course Attribute
 Attribute: Think about your degree requirements and the number of credits you need in
each area.
 Subject: Choose a subject that sounds interesting to you.
 Course: Choose a 100-200 level course.
 Add Course
 Return to Planner
Example:
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